Building Poetry Communities on WordPress.com

Lately, I’ve been spilling with ideas left and right. I’ve always wanted to start my own literary journal and open mic show. On top of creating a microblogging/social network website for writers all over the world, that way you can not only share your work but information on writing too.

The WordPress.com Blog

As we’re entering the final week of National Poetry Writing Month (NaPoWriMo) in the US, we want to celebrate all the wonderful poetry-centric community projects here on WordPress.com.

The sites we feature today — like many others we follow and love — make an important point. We may all write on our own, but it’s only when we join a community of other writers and readers that our voices are truly heard.


Keeping it local

Some of the tightest-knit poetry groups are bound by a shared space, where writers know not only each other’s work, but also each other’s face. Over at Poetdelphia, Philly-based poets share poems, announce readings and other events, and celebrate community members’ achievements.

typewriter poetry2Ghostless Sleep, by Yasin Chines at Xsentric.

Similarly, .: Poetry in Chicago is a project that aims to bring together writers from across the city’s eclectic poetry community, with posts on

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The Black Cat Blue Sea Awards

11/5/2016

Finally, on my break after having a not-so-good-day at work, and as I’m checking my emails I see that my blog has been awarded. That totally made my day! I’ve been blogging for six years now, but you all on WordPress are truly amazing. I mean that from the bottom of my heart, I’ve discovered talented writers on here and you folks have been nothing but uplifting. Shout out to Sidra Owens, you have a beautiful soul. Again, I want to thank everyone who checks out my webpage y’all are really dope.

Sincerely,
T.M. Sibley 


Three Questions for To’Wednesday S.


SO: How has blogging expanded your ability to express yourself?

Say what you mean and mean what you say.
—proverb

TS: As a child, I was rambunctious and from my pre-teens and now I grew reclusive. This was largely impacted by my anxiety and depression. However, in my writing, I am loud! I want the readers to feel something, whether they agree or not, and blogging has allowed me to do so. Whatever you put online can never be erased, there’s always a way to retrieve it, and that taught me how to utilize getting my message across.

SO: Do you find that your online, social interactions with people are far different than those you experience on a day to day basis, face to face? If so, how are they different?

TS: Depending on the audience who’s reading, I can be perceived as an intellectual, humanitarian or a Kanye West [laughs]. I learned online you can’t go wrong with going into detail—at the same time leaving room for people to figure it out as well. Broad statements are left to open interpretation. In person, people tend to see that I mean well and I’m either speaking from experience or sharing knowledge. So, I’m trying to find the medium of people knowing my intent isn’t antagonistic at all—I just want people to know what’s going on in their surroundings outside their bubble, and mine too.

SO: Do you feel that the collective small positive actions of a large group of people can significantly affect or even counter a large negative act by one person?

TS: It depends how the interpretation of the message is getting across, sometimes you gotta find new ways to achieve that. Then there are other times when the other party just doesn’t want to listen. Simple as that, either by ignorance or a powerful presence of negativity. Where there is a positive there’ll be a negative too.


About T.B.C.B.S. Award

The Black Cat Blue Sea Award is given to those bloggers who strive to write for everybody, and no matter how many viewers they get, make an impact on a reader. This award is an expression of gratitude to the nominee. It should be awarded to anybody that you choose to deserve it and it doesn’t mean that they must have hundreds of followers and likes.

The Rules:

  1. Anybody nominated can nominate eight bloggers.
  2. The nominee has to answer three questions asked by the nominator.
  3. Questions should be inoffensive and you can ask any three questions to your nominations.

Three Questions for The Lucky Nominees

Marissa D. Price  •  Oriette D’Angelo   •  Madeline A. Windsor • Tre
Janna Michelle • Emoni • Nasrullah Kamaldeen   • Karlee Steffanni

1.  Some people don’t look at writing as being therapeutic, but for few it is. How did writing help you as a whole?

2. Why did you decide to take a brave act in sharing your creative work with the world? Some aren’t open to being vulnerable.

3. What impact do you want your writing to have on your audience?

How to Delete Facebook? Here’s How.

So I got my first Facebook page around 2010—this was the time when MySpace was still popular, then deleted it around 2012 because I got bored. I decided to get another one the year after to boost my then blog The Young Book Collector but it didn’t go well, anyway, I decided to keep it because my friends and family had one too.

Since then, I’ve been involved with social justice issues, and I’ve found Facebook to be really toxic. For now, my personal account has been deactivated, and my page is being run by a family friend for updates.

But how come Facebook won’t let you delete your account? I’m guessing for financial reason, more people more money. Who knows, but to make a long story short log into your account, then click on this link in case you want to delete your account.

xo,
To’Wednesday Sibley

WordPress Help!

Umm… okay, so I’ve been on WordPress for a while and I’ve noticed that I’m getting a lot of traffic, but barely any comments. I like talking to people, so I don’t know if I’m doing something wrong or what. Anyway,  just putting it out there PLEASE COMMENT I want to talk to YOU! If I’m doing something wrong, let me know.

Quote

Breathe

Friends and Poets and Performers

I just want to be clear on something, when we walk up to the mic and take that breath, we are not being dramatic or cliché.

We are saying we care.

We are attempting to live in that moment and re-engage with the piece, convince ourselves we made the right choice, that this is the one they have to hear from me, this is what I must share.

We take that breath because we don’t want to fuck up our good, good work and embarrass ourselves/poetry parents/ that good art we been craftin’. We are saying our work deserves a breath.

When I breathe before I begin my poem, I am really saying “don’t fuck it up” and “you bet not fart during this poem.”

― AKeemjamal Rollins, author of Suicide Note

Artist be like…

Here’s a collection of pictures of folks I’m cool with fooling around or enjoying the art in front of us.